Research

With a strong background in natural resource management and cultural anthropology, the research topics that captured my interest and curiosity involved indigenous relationships to their land. It includes traditional ecological knowledge, harvesting practices, food security and decisions made to access their resources. And yes, it did become political because people's livelihoods are at stake.

This section contains research obtained while working with Inuit in Nunavut, and the Mi'kmaq and Maliseet peoples of New Brunswick.

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Interviews

These are the words of the elders, hunters, homemakers, band councillors, and community influencers. Indigenous peoples are expressing their thoughts and concerns regarding their land, their culture, and their wellbeing.

Some were in the midst of disputes with government, industry and the courts. Some voiced concerns for their children. Others wanted to leave behind a record for future generations. Many have now passed away and their voices are heard no more.

These are their stories.

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Blog

Living and learning cross-culturally can dramatically alter one's view of life, the land, and the ones whom inhabit it.

For fifteen years, I worked with indigenous peoples in Nunavut, the Inuvialuit Settlement Region, and on the east coast of Canada.

In a small way, I participated in their way of life on the land.

This blog contains reflections on the many experiences and lessons I was taught during this time,  but didn't always understand.

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Message of Website

Indigenous cultures in Canada display rich diversity in knowledge, practice, beliefs and adaptations to their environment.

And like every culture, they consist of individuals who display wide diversity in thoughts and actions - of compassion and cruelty, thoughtfulness and neglect, gentleness and violence, encouragement and ridicule.

Throughout this website controversial views and incidences are described. It is important to understand that these views and incidences are not characteristic of all indigenous people. Nor should it be assumed that these views are still held by the person sharing them. This research represents a snap-shot in time.

Indigenous people deserve the opportunity to voice their anger and frustrations, to make mistakes, to adapt, and to move on - like every other Canadian.

Inuit elders talk about their life on the land - Free transcript

Sign up to receive a FREE transcript of Inuit elders describing their lives on the land. On February 19 2004, nine Ahiarmiut (Ihalmiut) elders met in Arviat to talk about how their land was connected to their health and wellbeing. The elders were decedents of the Inland Caribou people from Ennadai Lake whose plight received international attention in Farley Mowat's People of the Deer (1951), and The Desperate People (1959).

Eva Mukjurnik
Job Mukjurnik
Elder's Traditional Knowledge Workshop pic, Feb 19 2004
Mary Anautilik
Elder's Traditional Knowledge Workshop pic, Feb 19 2004
Elder's Traditional Knowledge Workshop pic, Feb 19 2004
Elder's Traditional Knowledge Workshop pic, Feb 19 2004
Elder's Traditional Knowledge Workshop pic, Feb 19 2004
Elder's Traditional Knowledge Workshop pic, Feb 19 2004
Elder's Traditional Knowledge Workshop pic, Feb 19 2004
Elder's Traditional Knowledge Workshop pic, Feb 19 2004
Elder's Traditional Knowledge Workshop pic, Feb 19 2004